INTERMEDIATE

If you have seen the beginner program,  and you want to step up the game, follow along with this article we’re going to explain split routines which is what is considered to be the next step in your calisthenics journey, we’ll explain a weekly schedule for an example a workout format and we’ll even demonstrate the workout for you.

We going to start off by talking about split routines, if you’ve seen our beginner routine video and if you’ve been following that then you know that we recommend a full-body workout for beginners but once you start branching off into intermediate then split routines really become the best method in my opinion for advancing so here’s what a split routine is: the division of a workout routine in two separate logical groupings for the purpose of increasing volume and specificity so which mean that you’re going to create separate logical groupings like you’re going to group your muscle groups, or by movement, or by skill, however, you want to. and you’re going to use those groupings to have multiple workouts to hit your full body.

you’re going to spread those workouts across multiple days and the reason for this is that you can do more volume meaning more sets and reps for each muscle group or each movement but also for specificity so that you can target certain muscle groups if you feel like they’re lagging behind now let’s look at some example split routines so you have an idea of what we mentioned here these are an example today splits first one being upper body lower body and we personally like this one we use it quite often.

so it’s a two-day split, in the first workout you do, perhaps on Monday you’re going to do upper body and then in the next day, you’re going to do lower body so you’re just separating the body and the two halves like that it’s really simple but you can get complex with it actually as you’re going to see but it’s a great routine another good example of a two-day split is half rang of motion, and the full range of motion, where you’re separating the skills and the types of exercises so something like half pull-ups, bent arm handstand or triceps dips or anything where you’re going to be performing half rang of motion that would be on the (H.R) day and then the full range of motion.

 and here’s a couple of examples three day splits so you can see what we’re talking about with more than two days you’ve got push-pull legs is a good example that’s a really popular one in bodybuilding and it’s something that we’ve applied to calisthenics, it’s really popular, a lot of people use push-pull legs across three days and then in bodybuilding they’ll even break it up more because they’re doing a lot of isolation work they’ll do chest and triceps on one day back and biceps on another and then legs and shoulders on the third day so there are all kinds of ways there are really unlimited ways you can split up your body into a split routine and what is the best split routine? the truth is there is no best one, there’s no right or wrong way to do this so if you feel like you want to maybe design your own split routine based on your goals and you think you know what’s best for what you’re trying to achieve go for it do it because there’s no right or wrong way to do this.

before we go any further let’s talk about all the upper body movements because that’s going to help us break down and understand all the exercises we’re going to do for the upper body lower body split first let’s look at the different pushes movements for the upper body, starting with horizontal push horizontal pushing involves your arms being out in front of you perpendicular to your torso and you press forward initiating the movement from your chest and using your triceps and anterior deltoids. The second push movement we’re going to look at is upward vertical pushing this movement involves straightening your arms to press straight overhead and the majority of the movement is going to be initiated by the shoulders but you’ll notice that as your arms straighten at the top of the movement you’re really pushing from the serratus anterior and lat in the side of your back beneath the armpits and the third movement we’re going to look at for pushing is downward vertical pushing most commonly seen in dips but also used in the L-sit this is when you move your shoulders downwards away from your ears.

 and now we’ll look at the three pulling movements which are really the same as the pushing movements because we’re going to start with horizontal pull so with arms perpendicular to the torso this time you’re pulling and retracting the shoulder blades squeezing them together this is going to initiate from the rhomboids in the upper middle back also using the rear dolts and the biceps and forearms notice here that when I pull back I’m squeezing my shoulder blades together retracting them then there’s downward vertical pulling most commonly seen in the pull-up and this is when your arms are fully extended overhead and then you bend at the elbows pulling down initiating the movement from your lats to pull your shoulder blades down and together and then there is upward vertical pulling this is when your arms are down at your sides and you pull your shoulder girdle up so your shoulders go up towards your ears it’s like you’re shrugging your shoulders and this is a movement known as scapular elevation so now that you know what does it mean when you hear something like horizontal pushing or upward vertical pulling let’s move on and take a look at a weekly schedule for this upper lower split.

The longer you train the stronger you get, if you start feeling like these workouts is too easy for you, you can increase Rounds, Rep range, or both, as you can add or switch exercises it always depends on your goals.